Civil Air Patrol Cadets Stop by FDK

Civil Air Patrol cadets at FDk

Cadets from the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) stopped by the Frederick Municipal Airport for a group photo with N875CP, a Cessna 182. The same aircraft is depicted in a painting titled “Total Force Partners” flying a patrol over Washington, D.C. alongside an Air Force F-16 fighter jet.  The group photo was part of a CAP mission to ferry a copy of the painting to a sister squadron in Virginia.  The original will be displayed in the Pentagon.

fueling a low wing airplane at Bayland Aviation at Sby

Great new things are happening at the SBY Regional Airport!  Check it out:

  1. We now have a “fly-in” Flight surgeon office on our airfield.  Please schedule your next Fight Physical with Dr. Thomas Rosenthal – 410-860-8446
  2. RFP was just released seeking developers for our new Box and T-Hangar complex.  The box hangars will be 60’ x 60’ with dual door access, and the T-Hangars will have 49’ electric bi-fold door. This project will also include an ECO –Friendly aircraft wash rack and restroom.  If you aren’t already on our wait list,  you may have missed a fantastic opportunity.  Go to Wicomico County Website and Bids. And contact SBY  Regional Airport for Hangar availability- –  410-548-4827
  3. We will have self- serve fuel next fall to include SWIFT 80/87 octane fuel for various types of GA aircraft.
  4. We have completed the resurfacing of the Taxilanes between the three existing T-Hangars!  No more Pot-holes.
  5. We will begin painting the T-Hangars this summer.
  6. Corporate Hangar Ramp Resurfacing and Painting are pending our budget approval.  Will know by June 15th!

We are actively seeking another FBO for Corporate Jet Service Center that will provide maintenance and avionics services to all GA Aircraft.  These are just a few of the exciting new facilities and improvements being made at SBY Regional Airport.  Check us out at www.flySBYairport.com

Massey’s 15th Chili Fiesta Fly-In

Massey’s 15th Chili Fiesta Fly-In was a success despite low ceilings early and rain up north that kept most PA & NJ fliers at home. When the sun broke out we had 60 guest planes including a T-6 Texan (WWII trainer) from the Richmond, VA area. The parking lot was full of local drive-ins and our visitors brought just the right amount of chili to share. The turn-out made for a fine, relaxing day. The pilots come mainly for the camaraderie after a long Winter, a chance to look at some unusual, interesting planes and the free food is a bonus. Massey is fortunate to have such a well drained grass runway, and as usual it was perfect despite the rain earlier in the week. Massey built a ten unit T-Hangar over the Winter (our first) and it should be operational by July. When I say we built it, I mean that literally – Massey volunteers erected the structural steel frame and the 20 (20’) rolling steel doors. Now we are looking forward to the 50th Anniversary Antique Fly-In conducted by the Potomac Antique Aero Squadron (PAAS) on June 9th. This is the former Horn Point Fly-In that moved up to Massey 3 years ago. As the only Antique Airplane Assoc. (AAA) JUDGED event in our region, it attracts the best restorations and it feels like it belongs at Massey Aerodrome.

    

 

Easton Airport Celebrates 75th Anniversary

On July 20th, Easton Airport celebrates it’s 75th year with the unveiling of a permanent  exhibit in the terminal documenting the history of Talbot County Airports.  Check out the display when you fly in and learn about “Early Talbot County Airports”.

TRED AVON AIRPORT

The very first ‘airport’ in Talbot County was probably Trippe Creek. In 1921, a former WWI flyer, Capt. Ewing Easter, flew a scheduled daily flight to and from Baltimore using a seaplane, landing and taking off from the creek.

The first airport, some called it a landing site or air field, was established in 1928 at Ratcliffe Manor, just southwest of Easton on the Tred Avon River. It was listed in early aviation directories as Tred Avon Airport and served as a center for aviation on the Eastern Shore.

The Hathaway brothers, Stephen and Malcolm, created the airfield on their family estate to serve as a base for their new aviation business, the Tred Avon Flying Service. They offered charter flights, pilot training, aerial photography, fuel, and repairs. The runways were on pastureland consisting of two sod landing strips about 1,700 and 1,900 feet long. The “L” shaped airfield also had three hangars. The airfield was quite modest and had its fair share of challenging features, like a line of wire-bearing poles bordering the longer landing strip.

However, large crowds were attracted to the site on weekends to watch the Hathaways and others perform death-defying stunts such as standing on the wings of aircraft during flight. They made money by taking folks for short rides after the show. But the airport was short-lived, as Malcolm moved his business to Webb Airport sometime in 1932.

Today, the airfield is part of the housing development, Ratcliffe Farms, on the St. Michaels Road, about one-half mile from the Easton by-pass. 1.

  1. Preston, Edmund, Lanman, Barry A, & Breihan, John R. Maryland Aloft: A Celebration ofAviation, Airfields, and Aerospace. Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 2003.